SAT changingBy Stacey Seybold Hiller, CCC-SLP in Fortune Academy, Speech and Language Therapy, Education, College Prep

Everything old is new again…. The SAT (collegeboard.org) is changing. This is the first substantial change made to this time-honored exam in eleven years.  The college board made the changes to “reflect the changes in education”.   This is true, but it is a good thing?  The answer is sort of.

Let me explain:

  • Let’s begin with the changes that will be good for our students.  First off, there is no longer going to be any penalty for a wrong answer.  So this means that if a student can narrow the answers done even a little, they should guess.  It means they should ALWAYS guess.  The only penalty now will be for an unanswered question.
  • They are allowing for more time per most sections.  Since most of our students receive the accommodation of more time, that means they get more time as well.
  • They are now providing FREE test prep in conjunction with the Khan Academy online education service.  Currently, you have to pay a fairly large sum of money for specific SAT prep courses.  Now, students can learn and prep online.  Which allows for as much repetition as they need, which is another perk.  This is a great place to start with your student.  Do some of the online prep with Khan academy with them.  It may help you understand how they may do on the SAT in the future.
  • The essay portion is now optional.  Some schools may require it, but you do not have to take it anymore (which has also made the point total of the entire test go from 2400 to 1600).

Now on to the challenges:

  • The math portion has been changed in several ways.  One is that the majority of the problems no longer allow/require a calculator.  The reason is that the problems are now almost as much about reading as they are about math.  In some cases, the word count of the problems have tripled.  We are back to the quintessential word problem.  Students will need to weed out the information that they need in order to figure out what the problem is, then go on to solve it.  One important note:  The SAT assumes that the student has had at least 3 years of high school math.  If your student has not had that much math instruction yet, they will literally be being testing on information they have yet to learn.
  • The second section “Evidence Based Reading” will now look at a student’s ability to comprehend passages and understand/figure out new words in context.  While they got rid of the obscure “SAT words” that students used to try to learn just for the test, and then never hear or use again, they have put a greater emphasis on reading comprehension.  In addition, they will ask questions to have the student explain how they got to the conclusion that they did, which is a complex language skill.
  • The writing section is now more about using and recognizing correct grammar, and being able to build a good argument.  If given a writing prompt for example, the student may have to build a complete and complex outline showing how to argue for or against the issue within the writing prompt.

So is it better or worse for our students?  The answer is….it depends on the student.  For some of our students who are heading to college, the ACT may now be a better option.  For some of our students, these changes will work in their favor.  For others, attending a school that does not require either test may be the best option.  As parents, you can work with your student’s teachers to help decide what is best for them.  One important note:  Your child’s SAT scores are NEVER released to any school unless they are specifically authorized to do so; so if your child attempts the test once or twice and doesn’t do well, no one will ever have to see those scores.

The best news of all is that there are many secondary education opportunities that do not require SAT or ACT scores as a criteria for admission.  If you have not had a chance to do so yet, take a look at the COLLEGES THAT CHANGE LIVES website;  http://www.ctcl.org/

It is a wealth of information regarding these kinds of schools.

About the Author

Stacey Seybold Hiller is Owner of Indy Pediatric Speech Solutions as well as Speech and Language Instructor for Fortune Academy.  Stacey specializes in individualized therapeutic teaching for children to improve their speech, language, oral-motor, and overall communication skills. 

 

Blogger Janet George, M.S., M.Ed., Fellow/AOGPE

The advantages of a small school for any child appear to be obvious to those who give some thought to the topic. However, these advantages become critical to the success of a child with Learning Disabilities. Some advantages include:class size

  • small class sizes allowing for more direct instruction for each child
  • more time on-task, because the time needed to move a classroom of six children through the building is much less than for a classroom of thirty or more
  • less (no) chance that a child will “fall through the cracks” by going unnoticed in a classroom too big to monitor
  • the pace at which materials are taught can be more readily adapted (slower or faster) to the needs of each child
  • curriculum can be targeted to the specific interests of the child, allowing for an increase in the intrinsic desire to learn (self-motivation!)
  • the opportunity for learning while utilizing “hands-on” activities increases
  • negative behaviors, such as bullying, are more easily monitored and corrected in the moment
  • children get to know one another better creating an atmosphere of “family”
  • the environment itself is less intimidating and less overwhelming
  • smaller schools can offer “no cut” policies within the athletic department, allowing every child the opportunity to participate in team sports
  • allowing children to be “big fish” in a little pond, instead of always being the “little fish” in the big pond (These “big fish” moments are what build self-confidence for children with Learning Disabilities)
  • parents having more opportunity to become involved with the school, as well as other parents, creating a network of support for children and parents

Moving past the “obvious” advantages, one is moved to wonder whether there are those advantages that are not quantifiable with numbers, testing data or assessment outcomes. What if the following outcomes are a result of smaller classrooms?

  • What if the child who feels a sense of belonging stays away from the wrong crowd because he doesn’t need to settle for negative attention?
  • What if the child who feels accepted chooses not to use drugs to numb the pain of rejection?
  • What if the child who feels talented doesn’t cut or self-harm because she has a focus on which to build?
  • What if the child who feels capable applies for a job knowing he can do it?
  • What if the child who feels smart applies to go to college?
  • What if the child who feels gifted begins to share that gift with other children who have Learning Differences
  • What if the child who feels successful creates her own business?

What if?…

Blogger Janet George is Head of School for Fortune Academy

 

 

 

Vocabulary

Blogger Janet George, M.Ed., Fellow/AOGPE

If you have a learning difference or live with a person who has a learning difference, you struggle with language. Language, according to Webster’s is; any set or system of such symbols as used in a more or less uniform fashion by a number of people, who are thus enabled to communicate intelligibly with one another. Dyslexia is a neurological difference in the brain and effects the brain’s ability to process language “into, through, and “out of” the brain. So the “symbols and systems” of language are disrupted, and communication inhibited. Struggling with language can look like several things: Does any of this sound familiar?figures reading

  • Trouble with reading, writing, spelling and possibly the “words” of math (less than, minus, fewer than, increases, decreases, greater than, etc.).
  • Finds it difficult to retrieve certain words – especially under pressure – and uses the words “thing” and “that” to excess.
  • Confusing letter names and sounds, difficulties blending sounds into words, slow rate of reading, trouble remembering after reading text, tires easily when reading.

So if an individual is struggling with language it makes sense his/her vocabulary is often limited. The older one gets, this can further frustrate the desire to affectively use and interpret language, seeming to create a vicious cycle of feeling lost in conversation and socially complex situations.

So how does an individual with learning differences work to acquire a rich vocabulary? Direct teaching in a multi=sensory hands on way is the most effective means for a person with LD to learn. Direct, specific, and goal oriented with an end in sight. Here are some ideas to get you started.

  • Truth: Despite having a learning difference, you can build your vocabulary and improve your language skills!
  • Incorporate a visual cue for the new word (draw the word, cut and paste a photo from the website and paste onto an index card, or a picture of something that reminds you of the word. Make a vocabulary book– store it – keep it– touch it, see it, use it.
  • Use the word in a sentence that makes sense. Write the sentence below the picture of the vocabulary word.  Make sure the sentence has meaning that you understand or it needs to be broken down.
  • What is the root of the word? Find out what its prefix or suffix means.   What is a good synonym for the word. Write it down and discuss how it’s the same/different.

5)      Limit new words to a workable number to ensure success.   Make an obtainable goal, maybe its 3 words then later 5. Don’t set yourself up to fail at the task, set yourself up to reach the goal. This will eliminate the anxiety that comes with feeling overwhelmed by too much “undoable” information at a time, and prove that yes, the learning challenged student ( because you are smart) can learn new vocabulary and participate in complex language environments. You can do it.

 

Janet George is Head of School at Fortune Academy